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THE 70:20:10 FRAMEWORK More and more businesses are adopting 70:20:10 to help build organizational strength. However, a question often posed is whether the approach is a theory of workplace learning, a way of cutting down on training costs, or a mantra to be followed slavishly. Alternatively, is 70:20:10 simply ‘old wine in new bottles’ given that most Learning and Development (L&D) professionals think they already combine learning and work? Some ask ‘why bother with 70:20:10 at all’? Additionally, ‘what is it with this neat formula - 70, 20, 10’? People are suspicious of nice round numbers. Surely the reality of learning and performing is much too complex to be described in terms of simple ratios? Despite all these criticisms, there’s a worldwide movement of L&D professionals who realize and acknowledge the value of 70:20:10. This is not because it’s a mantra, an ideology or an end in itself, but because it enables them to connect more quickly and effectively to what really matters: learning and performing at the speed of business. Their work isn’t just about providing formal learning solutions. By using 70:20:10 as a reference model, more and more L&D professionals are co-creating solutions with their business colleagues. This ‘movement’ and new way of working with 70:20:10 makes L&D more relevant to their organizations.
Organizations are finally realizing that people learn more of what they need to be effective at their job through informal channels, on-the-job experiences and coaching than they do through more formal means. When it comes to developing and executing the learning strategy, however, companies continue to look at things completely upside-down. The vast majority of the learning delivered within organizations is through formal classrooms and e-learning courses, which only accounts for about 10% of the learning that occurs. Even within that 10%, retention rates for single, formal learning events are abysmal, with most learners forgetting close to 90% of what they learned over time. What opportunities are companies missing to help people retain more of what they are learning and discover new knowledge through other, more informal channels?  
The BIG Question for 2017: Have companies built a workforce strategy where employees become a competitive advantage? More than ever, today’s CEOs recognize the tremendous competitive advantage in a workforce that’s highly motivated, excited and tightly connected to business goals. Building a powerful workforce strategy remains front and center for HR teams. The BIG Challenge: Technology For many companies, talent management technology was supposed to offer the answers. And it did in many ways: less paper, lower costs, saved time. You know the drill. However, traditional talent management technologies focus on automating HR functions, often ignoring business goals and the most important consumer, employees. Brandon Hall Group research indicates a high dissatisfaction with technology and a need to go beyond traditional approaches, engaging today’s savvy employees with more than an automated process to align with business goals. The BIG Shift: Moving Beyond Processes to Experiences As HR leaders look ahead to 2017, attention is shifting. Processes remain important, but a new emphasis emerged on moving beyond activities to creating an employee journey that attracts, motivates and connects to company results.
As today's organizations stare down the challenges of ever-increasing compliance regulations, unpredictable turnover, and rapidly expanding cultural and learning style changes among employees, companies are looking for new ways to automate and scale their training efforts. More and more, they're finding that help in video. Adaptable to both formal and informal learning needs, video overcomes today's most common training challenges. It helps instructors increase training quality, speed and effectiveness — all while significantly lowering program costs. But of course, today's learning and development professionals already understand the potential that technology can offer in the modern training environment. Their real challenge? Convincing their organizations to do more. In this paper, we help L&D practitioners tackle that challenge head on, including: • 5 benefits that help convince your decision makers to use video in more ways • 14 ideas for supporting and scaling formal and informal learning with video • 1 technology — the video platform — that simplifies the use of video for L&D Video training is no longer a novel idea. It's the new normal. Make sure your organization isn't missing out. Click below to download this White paper.
Most organizations agree that talent is their most important asset, but the results of a new survey show that most businesses are not in tune with employee perceptions around key talent imperatives, including engagement, training and career development. Reaching 1,800 HR leaders and employees across the U.S. and the UK, the recent 2017 State of Employee Engagement Survey conducted by Saba Software highlights the challenges many organizations face in capturing consistent employee feedback and accurately assessing engagement across the organization. The survey also warns of gaps between the perception and reality of talent management program effectiveness, and the impact on critical talent outcomes. This report delves deeper into the survey findings, providing insight organizations can use to close potential gaps that exist between business leaders and employees in critical areas, including feedback and engagement, training, performance management and career development.
AN EXCERPT FROM FROST & SULLIVAN’S ‘ENHANCING OMNICHANNEL AGENT PRODUCTIVITY’ REPORT - NOVEMBER 2016 There is no substitute for the human touch provided by omnichannel contact center agents when connecting virtually with customers for complex service and sales support issues. Agents are the linchpin to successful and profitable Customer Experiences. But it’s costly to hire, train, manage, accommodate, and equip agents to perform these essential tasks. Wages and benefits comprise the lion’s share of operating expenses (65%-70%). Moreover, having contact center agents work on premise incurs significant real estate, facilities, and equipment outlays. In today’s competitive environment, organizations (businesses, non-profits, and government agencies) must delight customers and control costs in order to exceed their goals and spur growth. Ensuring that contact center agents are productive and engage with learning is essential. Recommendation: Click below to download
Organizations that leverage learning beyond traditional on-boarding and mandated compliance training reap the rewards of a more engaged, more skilled and more productive workforce. But getting today’s distracted, impatient and busy learners to participate in training and development activities isn’t easy. Dealing with the realities of low adoption rates are a reoccurring nightmare for learning and development (L&D) teams. THE COLD, HARD FACTS ABOUT THE DISTRACTED WORKFORCE It’s no secret that you’re competing for your learner’s attention, but here are a few facts that might startle you: • 67% of organizations struggle with low learning management system (LMS) adoption rates1; • 88% of employees don’t have time, or make the time, to engage with L&D oerings, • 64% of managers don’t encourage, enable or follow up with L&D, and • 64% of people are not aware of what is available in their LMS2. The concept of "if you build it, they will come" doesn’t hold true for learning organizations. If you build it, they will not come. Not unless you come up with a solid marketing, content, delivery and engagement strategy to get them there. THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF AN ENGAGING TRAINING PROGRAM The nuts and bolts of an engaging training program really come down to a well thought out strategy focused on the learner’s experience. Many learners forget - or were never really made aware of - the benefits of learning and development. They don’t realize the resources available at their disposal that are designed to polish their skills and advance their careers. It’s your job to make them aware.
NeuroTracker evolved out of a pure science approach through years of research at Prof. Faubert’s Visual Psychophysics & Perception Laboratory. Designed to uniquely measure and enhance high-level cognitive function, it has become established as a valuable research tool for understanding human performance. The not-for-profit CogniSens Applied Research Center (ARC) supports an increasing number of NeuroTracker research projects across a variety of science disciplines. To date, published studies discovered important neuroscience findings in the following areas. Measurement NeuroTracker provides objective cognitive metrics on brain functions fundamental to human performance, and also relevant in cognitive conditions. High-level mental processing is required to perform NeuroTracker at increasing speed threshold, as such, measures have been found to differentiate elite performers from amateur, reveal characteristic of brain development with age, identify impairment with healthy aging or learning related disorders, and possibly to help to detect function-related brain damage, such as with concussions, and reveal non-contact sports injury risk.  
Career development appears at the top of many list. Unfortunately, the lists tend to be focused on what employees desperately want but are not getting from their managers. As for managers, most appreciate the value of career development and really which they could do it more frequently and more effectively than they currently do. But let's face it: a manager's day-to-day reality are kaleidoscopic blur of meetings, responsibilities, and shifting priorities. Helping employees develop and grow is one of many activities perpetually pushed out in time to the elusive someday that too rarely comes. How could managers get past this conundrum? How can they make career development happen within the pressure-cooker reality that is business today? The answer is definitely not new systems, checklists, processes, or forms. Those have actually contributed to the problem.
Today's C-Suite executives have a wide variety of concerns, mostly involved with planning, managing and affecting change throughout the organization.  They are also concerned about multiple constituencies - customers, shareholders, employees, suppliers, competitors, business partners, regulatory agencies and the various governments in which they operate - both domestically and internationally.  C-Suite executives are willing to meet with professional salespeople if they are convinced that the salesperson can deliver true business value to them. This white paper will outline the six steps that will enable you to successfully engage with C-Suite executives - and to maintain and leverage those relationships over the long term. We also invite you to view this complimentary recorded webinar:
A Perspective on Competencies by Hale Associates.
Able, adjusted, all systems go, apt, equipped, fit, in order, organized, planned, prepared, primed, qualified, rehearsed, set. These are all synonyms for the word ready. The question is, can you really be sure that these words apply to your sales team? To help you not only shift the way you think about sales readiness, but actually take steps towards ensuring your own sales organization’s readiness, we have compiled 22 tips to guide you.  
Just as B2B sales strategies must adapt to increasingly savvy buyers, sales training must change too. This brief discusses how newer training content and methods can result in a better, smarter sales force.
Today’s dynamic global economy has increased the need for organizational training across all industries. Efficient, cost-effective training and employee development are necessary for day-to-day operations and for meeting strategic business objectives. Many organizations turn to online meeting tools to meet their needs, and there’s no shortage of options. Simple and free. Low-cost/low-feature. Enterprise-grade offerings built for business. But online learning and collaboration require more than a one-size-fits-all solution.
After spending close to 30 years in human resources and organizational development, and participating  in  countless  retention and succession planning initiatives, I’ve  come to the conclusion that employees are not primarily fired or promoted because of their education, skills, or even amount of experience. Of course, those things are important in their own ways; you are expected to be informed, up-to-date, and capable of doing the job, whatever that might be. However, it’s often the intangibles that define an outstanding employee (or conversely, the less-than-outstanding employee). Companies increasingly understand this shift, and have implemented behavior-based interview techniques during the candidate evaluation and selection process. This approach aims to match the key behavioral and / or trait competencies of an applicant to those that define success in  a  particular job - or in a broader sense, in the larger organization.
Do you wake up every Monday raring to go to work, full of new ideas, confident that you’ll be able to implement them, and passionate about what you do? If so, would you like to stay that way? And if not, doesn’t that sound pretty great?
Successful leaders think differently. They think intentionally about where they are and where they want to go. They think strategically about how they can get there from here. And successful organizations are made up of successful leaders. Can changing your thinking really change your life and how your organization functions? Consider this: after studying successful people for over forty years, John C. Maxwell believes they are all alike in one way: how they think! That is the one thing that separates the successful from the unsuccessful.
When you're leading remotely, with store visits at a minimum due to time and distance, you have to rely on technology to engage, motivate, and leverage the strengths of the entire team. This handy guide outlines the pitfalls to avoid and the pointers for effectively using the most common forms of electronic communications, including email, text messages, telephone, and voicemail.
This report looks at the implied promises to the instructional design field which include:  -Promises to the instructional designers/developers that they are valued not only financially but also as a professional.  -Promises to the instructional designer/developer’s organization that instructional designers/developers get better, deeper learning and show results through learning transfer.  -Promises to learners that their learning experiences are valuable use of their time and support their current and future work.  Finding ways to reach into organizations for these measures required tapping the instructional design industry and market. A series of focus groups or interviews was planned. This report summarizes the interview process, data, and projected next steps based on interview results. Data gathered about these promises will become part of the ID Certification application process of 2016. 
Large, global organizations typically operate disparate business systems around the world - increasing information technology costs and impacting service consistency for customers. To increase efficiency and performance, many enterprises choose to optimize their operations based on globally standardized ‘core’ systems. Implementing core software applications, such as SAP, PeopleSoft, SalesForce, Maximo, WorkDay, etc., takes a major investment not only in the technology infrastructure but also in preparing the end-users to operate within the system. Business cases are prepared to forecast the potential savings resulting from the installation of the new application. Assumptions are made on how quickly and thoroughly the users of the application will be able to use it efficiently and effectively. These expectations can be jeopardized if the technology roll-out is delayed or slowed because the users are not ready to meet these assumptions. If a company wants to achieve its business case goals, they need to ensure they get maximum end-user adoption with skilled, competent users.
It’s a new day for corporate training and those who manage learning functions. Today, traditional training programs aren’t enough to meet growing demands for better company performance, consistent compliance, changing employee expectations, and cost control. Companies can take learning to the next level with new tools and approaches that increase employee interest and engagement in learning, and are linked to employee performance, goal setting, and succession planning…all making a direct contribution to business growth. Ready to take learning to the next level? This Guide can help you get there. You’ll read about: Five essentials to transform learning Measuring ROI Tips to improve existing programs Case studies -- real-world examples of companies taking learning to the next level  
There are dozens of studies and surveys each year reporting on the "state of the training industry." With some modest differences, these reports are consistently reporting very similar data. Among the data points routinely reported are the following: annual per employee spending on training, how many hours of training are available to employees, what training areas organizations are emphasizing, the ratio of training budget to overall expenses or payroll, etc. In other words, you can find a myriad of fascinating metrics all telling about the training industry from the organization’s perspective. What about the employees’ perspective? Aren’t we all supposed to be training employees?
In this white paper we examine valuing alternative futures and the use of qualitative probability theory to weigh the consequences of different actions.  We'll show how to use a common platform to engage their clients in the process of identifying assumptions, weighing the risk of those assumptions materializing or not, and valuing choices based on the probability of possible outcomes. Benefits: The benefits are participants will receive a set of tools and decision models that encourage logical thinking, discipline, and consideration of organizational realities that, in turn, will help them:   Save time.   Avoid unnecessary costs.   Increase their confidence.   Be perceived as having business smarts.   
The employment market is fragmented and diverse. Every sector of business requires instructional designers and developers. Many employers prefer Instructional Designers (IDs) with experience in their business sector. This means that subject/content experts with a talent for teaching often move into instructional design using their field-specific knowledge as the key to open the door to course design and development, but with little or no formal preparation for quality instructional design and development. This paper discusses the practice analysis process, including survey results that generated nine primary skill set domains for IDs.  
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