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The Fourth Industrial Revolution We’ve entered the Fourth Industrial Revolution, where cars drive themselves, robots are more than a sci-fi storyline, and the line separating biology and technology is increasingly fuzzy. These are not unrealistic statements. LYFT’s CEO projects no need for car ownership by 2025, and 3D DNA printing is already a reality.­­­1 According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), this revolution is happening at an exponential pace, and the "speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent."2 For industries, organizations and employees alike, the Fourth Industrial Revolution offers tremendous benefits. However, within these very benefits lie the revolution’s most complicated — and sometimes frightening — challenges. While AI and robots aren’t making the human workforce obsolete, they are forcing employee roles to change. And that means organizations must begin to modify departments, staffing, training Click below to download this White paper.
You want your managers to deliver results. Not just any results - you’re looking for breakthrough results. In order to get that done, they must be viewed by their teams as smart, likable, hard working, and caring. But there’s another quality that can make or break a manager’s pursuit of success. Managers can only get their teams to execute the strategy successfully if they start with themselves. They must understand the strategy itself and see how internal/external forces and trends impact the business. They must know the customer needs and requirements, as well as be a role model of the culture, behaviors, and values of the organization. This paper will help managers discover, synthesize and internalize these critical qualities. Download Below.  
It is not uncommon for learners' jobs to depend on their ability to master the critical information delivered to them via training. Imagine you must design and deliver a learning solution that addresses a critical business need. What would your approach be? Every day, stakeholders and designers make choices that sabotage corporate learning efforts... and result in wasted dollars that produce no result. If learners take a course, will they remember what they learned? In this white paper, you will discover four learning strategies that maximize long-term retention. Then, you'll learn about four additional strategies that maximize the learning from a single training event.
"If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there!"  - Lewis Carroll This quote from Alice in Wonderland will predict your journey if you are leading your L&D function without a vision and mission statement. With helpful tips, techniques and exercises, we break it down for you so you can easily develop a function vision and mission statement of your own.
Maturity can be defined in many ways for a training organization. There’s maturity in the sense of tenure and respect within your organization, as well as maturity in the sense of trainees taking your information and applying it to their jobs. There’s even maturity in recognizing you have a lot of areas in which you need to grow. But what about your digital content program? There is a path to maturity that will let you progress nicely along without getting overwhelmed with all the options—shiny, fun new technology—available to you. There is a way to plan a digital content maturity path that will eventually lead to impactful and engaging training methods.  
While there are many similarities, there are differences between facilitating and training. This article discusses the difference between the roles of a trainer versus that of a facilitator.  
In today’s tight labor market with many hiring managers bemoaning the war for talent, organizations must be extremely competitive in the employee benefits they offer. Roy Skillicorn, senior director of learning and development for Cisco, and a Capella University School of Business and Technology Advisory Board member, shares his thoughts on trends in tuition assistance, how organizations benefit by offering such programs, and the risks they face if they don’t.
In sales, we often find ourselves grappling with a false choice – do we focus on relationship building with the customer, or focus more on winning the deal at all costs? It can often seem like there is no middle ground, we have to either perform like a hardliner or try and gain the customer's favor. But it is not, in fact, an either/or situation. This white paper explores the middle ground between building relationships and winning the deal and offers helpful tips on ways to nurture both your relationship with the customer while keeping your eye on the prize. Read more to discover how it might be the way salespeople think about their customer relationships that prevents them from focusing on and winning the deal. JMReid Group is a training company that provides sales programs with this middle ground at top of mind. If you like what you read, contact us in the interest of your sales team at www.jmreidgroup.com.
Team selling today is no longer required just for blockbuster business-to-business sales pitches. Whether you are in consulting, investment banking, or technology or are a financial advisor, home remodeler, or lawyer, pivotal meetings with customers and prospects now often involve more people — on both sides of the table. In fact, according to Harvard Business Review, "…the number of people involved in B2B solutions purchases has climbed from an average of 5.4 two years ago to 6.8 today."
Work looks completely different in 2017 than it did just a generation ago. Where we work looks different, how we work has changed, and the skills any given employee needs are evolving faster than we can keep up. The pace of change has created a gap between the skills employees have right now and the skills they need to be successful. Deloitte researchers have highlighted this issue, pointing out the "declining half-life of skills critical to the 21st-century organization." Click below to learn more about these trends.
Every job has its nuances. Every organization has its own customs and culture. Every employee, therefore, ends up with knowledge that no one else has. And that knowledge is not only rare but valuable. Call it "unique knowledge." It consists of everything an employee gains through specialized training and insider learning. Unique knowledge varies from organization to organization and from position to position. But it’s instrumental in tackling the complex problems and unexpected challenges that employees encounter at work more or less every day. On the one hand, this is fantastic. We all have our areas of expertise, hard-earned and distinct. On the other hand, it’s problematic. Most places of work don’t have a formal way of capturing unique knowledge and sharing it throughout the organization. So, more often than not, it remains stuck inside people’s heads. There are two big reasons to care about this. One is romantic: Knowledge is valuable, and it’s a shame to let good ideas go to waste. The other is practical: Unshared knowledge costs money. Click below to download this White Paper.
The truth about the future of work is that it’s unpredictable. As technology, industries, and demographics continue to shift, organizations have found themselves in a position as exciting as it is challenging: What will the future hold, and how do you prepare for the unexpected?  
As an L&D leader, you know that the business impact of learning and development is undeniable. In fact, a study by Bersin found that companies with high-impact learning programs generate, on average, three times higher profit growth than their peers.¹ Ongoing learning and development has the power to grow your employees, the business, and the results of your L&D programs. But all too frequently, it does not live up to its full potential. Why? Because in order to deploy effective employee learning and development, L&D professionals need to have a deep understanding of what motivates and inspires their people. L&D leaders that effectively shape their learning programs around the intrinsic needs, wants and motivators of their people - rather than expecting employees to adapt to a one-size-fits-all approach to learning - can improve employee engagement, learning retention and learning adoption. In this step-by-step guide, you'll learn the foundations behind three neuroscience principles of motivation - emotion, loss aversion, and social storytelling. You'll get the hands-on guidance you need to turn theory into practice and start applying these concepts to your L&D strategy immediately to boost learner engagement and learning outcomes. Download the guide today to get started designing a scientifically-driven learning experience that engages and motivates your people!
Video is increasingly the tool by which businesses communicate and share valuable information. As organizations continue to find new value in video - creating online training videos, streaming live executive broadcasts, webcasting events, and offering on-demand presentations and product demos - the question of where to keep all this video has become critical. Often this question comes down to two hosting options - video sharing sites like custom YouTube channels, or "the corporate YouTube" video content management system. Each option has its pros and cons, which are discussed in this paper.   Click below to download this white paper.
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